Flavours Less Travelled

It’s all about going slightly off the beaten track this year as consumers look to try new flavours

Last year ongoing travel restrictions drove many of us to seek adventure in different ways, like food. And consumers have become more experimental as a result. 6 in 10 people now like trying venues that offer new and interesting cuisines and food types. Over half (53%) say if they see a new cuisine on a menu that they haven’t had before they are likely to try it.

 

Let’s look at the key emerging cuisines that are gaining traction in 2022…

The Pacific Rim

With true fusion of exotic and fresh flavours, and some key dishes like the Hawaiian poke bowl being linked to health credentials, this cuisine is set to keep appearing more on menus and growing in popularity.

Click here to see our Glazed Teriyaki Salmon Poke Bowl recipe

Filipino

Filipino is also known as ‘the ultimate fusion cuisine’. More restaurants are specialising in Filipino cooking, and classic dishes like adobo with its salty, sweet and sour notes are appearing on the high street.

Click here to see our Pulled Chicken Adobo Bowl recipe

Peruvian

Fresh seafood, small dishes and sharing plates are all typical to the Peruvian cuisine. Its punchy exotic flavours are built from a mix of Japanese, Spanish and Arabic influences.

As well as the Peruvian cuisine itself, we’re now seeing more Peruvian twists on Mexican street food menus too.

Click here to see our Lomo Saltado recipe

Scandinavian

Scandinavian food is well-loved for its simplicity and fresh ingredients whilst at the same time creating satisfying hearty meals. Key cooking methods include preserving, smoking, pickling and salting – which originate from way back in the ancient viking days!

Click here to see our Scandinavian Open Sandwich recipe

Burmese

With only a handful of Burmese restaurants in the UK, this cuisine is still very niche. However, Burmese dishes combine unique flavours with familiar formats such as noodles and curries, making it easily adaptable for more mainstream menus, and not too ‘out-there’ for less adventurous consumers to experiment with. In fact, over 1 in 4 people say they’d be willing to eat Burmese food in a pub.

Click here to see our Burmese Shan Noodle recipe

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